“When Neglected Children Become Adolescents” AND More on Best 5 Monday Reads

Hello everyone! I hope you had a wonderful weekend. Lets start our brand new week with some interesting reads. Here we go!

1) When neglected children become adolescents

Many migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S. border, some of them very young, have landed in shelters where they often experience stress, neglect and minimal social and cognitive stimulation. The latest findings tell a cautionary tale about the psychiatric and social risks of long-term deprivation and family separation as children transition to adolescence.

2) The Opioid System: The Foundation for Social Risk and Reward

The opioid system is responsible for social pain and reward in the brain; therefore, understanding its underpinnings may help clinicians manage patients with depression and suicidal ideation.

3) He Got Schizophrenia. He Got Cancer. And Then He Got Cured.

A bone-marrow transplant treated a patient’s leukemia — and his delusions, too. Some doctors think they know why.

4) Mind Your Mindfulness — You’re Playing Right Into Their Hands

Occasionally, the contradiction of punitive, intrusive “wellness” becomes too ridiculous to bear and cracks under its own weight. One oft-mentioned catalyst for the recent teacher strike in West Virginia was a proposal to mandate the monitoring of teachers’ bodily movement via Fitbit just as the state government moved to limit pay raises and school funding. Capitalism will deplete you, while letting you think you have the means to improve your lot. Indeed, it will attempt to force its therapy on you. In the case of West Virginia’s top-down Taylorist wellness crusade, the state authorities clearly overplayed their hand; far more common are employer-sponsored initiatives, whether packaged as mindfulness training or meditation classes, that have been inserted into our working lives to help us talk ourselves down. Mindfulness—a state of hyper-awareness tempered with disciplined calm—has become the corporate mantra du jour. By encouraging increasingly put-upon employees to assume tree poses or retreat into an om in the face of frustration, corporate overlords mean to head off any mutinous stirrings before they have a chance to gain momentum. Even if CEOs themselves occasionally adopt these regimes with apparent sincerity, mindfulness serves the companies’ bottom lines first and foremost because it is fundamentally anti-revolutionary. “It’s hard not to notice how often corporate mindfulness aligns seamlessly with layoffs,” Laura Marsh writes. “Employees need a sense of calm too when their employer is flailing. Those productivity gains—an extra sixty-nine minutes of focus per employee per month—count for more when the ranks are thinning.”

5) WHO Reports 3 Million Alcohol-Related Deaths in 2016

The WHO’s new report paints a troubling picture of global trends in alcohol consumption and related health and social effects — and identifies policies to reduce this impact.

Thank you and see you tomorrow for more articles.

Best Regards,

Vikram


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