NIH to Put $1.1 Billion Toward Tackling Opioid Crisis AND more on Best 5 Thursday Reads!

Hello there!

Today we will be talking about National Institute of Health (NIH)’s allocation of 1.1 billion dollars to tackle opioid crisis, How to prevent suicide deaths among US army soldiers, How your mind under stress, gets better at processing bad news. In addition, we will also be discussing prevalence of depression in patients seeking physician assisted death (PAD).

1) NIH to Put $1.1 Billion Toward Tackling Opioid Crisis

The Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) initiative will support research into new avenues to prevent addiction, while also boosting efforts to implement existing addiction therapies in communities.

2) Loss of Enjoyment, Autonomy, Dignity: Top Reasons for Seeking Physician Assisted Death (PAD)

Research on mental illness among patients requesting PAD suggests most are not depressed. However, because the laws may not protect all patients with mental illness, there is a need for systematic evaluation of their mental status.

3) STARRS Findings Shed More Light On Army Suicides

More time in training and more time at home between deployments may help prevent suicide deaths among U.S. Army soldiers.

4) Gene variant may increase psychiatric risk after traumatic brain injury

A gene variant known to predict Alzheimer’s risk was linked to worse psychiatric symptoms in those with a traumatic brain injury. Study participants with the gene variant and at least one TBI had more severe PTSD, anxiety, and depression, compared with TBI patients without the same variant.

5) How your mind, under stress, gets better at processing bad news

Some of the most important decisions you will make in your lifetime will occur while you feel stressed and anxious. From medical decisions to financial and professional ones, we are often required to weigh up information under stressful conditions.


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